Mountain climbing in the Alaska mountains

Mountain climbing in the Alaska mountains

Descriptions and stories by mountaineers of their climbs and experiences from Knik River Valley dating from the 1950s to the present. Famed mountaineers, Sir Hohn Jillary and Sherpa Tailend wrote of their legendary climb in 1959. Bill Wakeland and his team tell of their 1982 quest to conquer the wilderness of Jim Creek to Friday Creek, located on the north side of Knik River, an area that they say used to be a veritable paradise for fish, ducks, sheep, goats, bear and moose.

Butte residents are blessed with a gorgeous area and spectacular scenery. They are happy to share these resources with visitors. Many people believe that once they are on public lands in Mat-Su, there’s no-holds barred recreation. We advise visitors to familiarize themselves with Department of Natural Resources publication of “Generally allowed uses on state lands.”
Stream Crossings: Motor vehicles are allowed to cross streams in ways that minimize impact to fish and wildlife and their habitat. Learn about Vehicle and Equipment Fords for Bodenburg, Jim, Friday Creeks and Knik River. For instance, crossing Bodenburg Creek is allowed only if you cross 100’ downstream from the permanent vegetation (tree line). Alaska Statute Remember, all streams in Knik Valley are salmon-bearing.

According to the Department of Natural Resources Habitat and Management,
“The penalty for violation is a Class A Misdemeanor (AS 41.14.925) which for a human whom is not an organization, is a maximum fine of $10,000 and may be subject to imprisonment for a term of not more than 1 year in jail. There are no bailable offenses. If a human is caught and cited, they go to court. The law applies to all anadromous fishes.”